Please ethnic groups in conflict horowitz pdf this error screen to 96. Please forward this error screen to 96. The resolution reaffirms the important role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, peace negotiations, peace-building, peacekeeping, humanitarian response and in post-conflict reconstruction and stresses the importance of their equal participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion of peace and security.

In order to ensure collaboration and coordination throughout the United Nations system in the implementation of the Security Council resolution, the Interagency Network on Women and Gender Equality established the Interagency Taskforce on Women, Peace and Security which is chaired by the Special Adviser on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women. In 2003, the Taskforce developed an Action Plan on the implementation of the resolution and contributed to the preparation of the Secretary-General’s study. A refugee camp for displaced Tutsi in Zaire following the Rwandan Genocide of 1994. An ethnic conflict is a conflict between two or more contending ethnic groups.

While the source of the conflict may be political, social, economic or religious, the individuals in conflict must expressly fight for their ethnic group’s position within society. This final criterion differentiates ethnic conflict from other forms of struggle. Ethnic conflict does not necessarily have to be violent. In a multi-ethnic society where freedom of speech is protected, ethnic conflict can be an everyday feature of plural democracies. For example, ethnic conflict might be a non-violent struggle for resources divided among ethnic groups.

Academic explanations of ethnic conflict generally fall into one of three schools of thought: primordialist, instrumentalist or constructivist. Recently, several political scientists have argued for either top-down or bottom-up explanations for ethnic conflict. The causes of ethnic conflict are debated by political scientists and sociologists. Explanations generally fall into one of three schools of thought: primordialist, instrumentalist, and constructivist.

More recent scholarship draws on all three schools. Proponents of primordialist accounts argue that “thnic groups and nationalities exist because there are traditions of belief and action towards primordial objects such as biological features and especially territorial location”. Primordialist accounts rely on strong ties of kinship among members of ethnic groups. Clifford Geertz, a founding scholar of primordialism, asserts that each person has a natural connection to perceived kinsmen. In time and through repeated conflict, essential ties to one’s ethnicity will coalesce and will interfere with ties to civil society. Ethnic groups will consequently always threaten the survival of civil governments but not the existence of nations formed by one ethnic group.